Tag: Soyuz

Launch Provider Panel at Space Tech Expo

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Inaugural Vega flight. (Credits: ESA - S. Corvaja, 2012)

Inaugural Vega flight. (Credits: ESA – S. Corvaja, 2012)

At the Space Tech Expo last week in Long Beach, Calif., representatives from Arianespace, Orbital Sciences Corporation, SpaceX and United Launch Alliance (ULA) discussed the fierce competition in the industry and their plans for the future.

PANELISTS

Carissa Christensen
Managing Partner
The Tauri Group
(Moderator)

Gwynne Shotwell
President & Chief Operating Officer
SpaceX

Daniel J Collins
Chief Operating Officer
United Launch Alliance

Clay Mowry
President
Arianespace

Frank Culbertson
Executive Vice President
Orbital Sciences Corporation

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Atlas V, Falcon 9 Launches Rescheduled

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The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft launches from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 41, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013, Cape Canaveral, Florida. NASA’s Mars-bound spacecraft, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, is the first spacecraft devoted to exploring and understanding the Martian upper atmosphere. (Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft launches from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 41, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013, Cape Canaveral, Florida. NASA’s Mars-bound spacecraft, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, is the first spacecraft devoted to exploring and understanding the Martian upper atmosphere. (Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

The Atlas V and Falcon 9 launches delayed by a problem on the Eastern Range have been rescheduled for April 10 and 14, respectively.

ULA’s Atlas V will launch NROL-67 — a National Reconnaissance Office payload — from Cape Canaveral on Thursday at 1:45 p.m. EDT. The launch window extends to 2:26 p.m. EDT. The company usually streams launched at www.ulalaunch.com.

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 will launch a Dragon freighter to the International Space Station. Liftoff is scheduled for 4:58 p.m. EDT. The company typically streams its launches at www.spacex.com.

The launches were delayed because of a fire that knocked out a crucial radar unit the U.S. Air Force uses to track launches. Florida Today has a story about the problems on the Eastern Range, which include aging technology and budget cutbacks.

Below is a list of upcoming launches worldwide.

Date Launch Vehicle Payload(s) Launch Site Nation
04/09/14 Soyuz Progress 55P Baikonur Russia
04/10/14 Atlas V NROL-67 CCAFS USA
04/14/14 Falcon 9 CRS 3 CCAFS USA
04/16/14 Soyuz EgyptSat 2 Baikonur Russia
04/27/14 Proton Luch 5V & Kazsat 3 Baikonur Russia
04/28/14 Vega DZZ-HR Kourou Europe

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Busy Launch Week Features Two Missions to ISS

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NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (left) and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov (center) and Oleg Artemyev of Expedition 39. (Credit:  NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (left) and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov (center) and Oleg Artemyev of Expedition 39. (Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

Russia will send a new new three-man crew to the International Space Station on Tuesday in one of five launches scheduled worldwide this week. SpaceX will follow up the crew launch on Sunday, March 30 by sending a Dragon freighter to the orbital outpost.

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Arianespace Wants to Compete in American Market

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Ariane 5

Ariane 5

Arianespace wants the U.S. market opened so that it can offer its launch vehicles to American customers.

Arianespace has called for an opening of the U.S. government market to international launch services competition, with the company ready to bid for such opportunities.

Speaking at the Satellite 2014 conference in Washington, D.C. today, Chairman & CEO Stéphane Israël said European governments have held competitions for civil and military satellites in which non-European launch services companies have openly competed and won contracts.

“Unfortunately, it is not completely open here in the United States – and Arianespace is fully ready to compete in the institutional markets everywhere – including the U.S.,” he said.  “We are quite sure we would be in a position to offer the best solutions for customers and the taxpayers.  And if it comes to a question of employment, we are ready to see how we can ‘Americanize’ our launcher.”

Israël noted that Arianespace continues to target a potential record number of missions in 2014 – with up to 12 missions involving its family of heavy-lift, medium and light-lift launchers.  He underscored that each of these vehicles – the Ariane 5, Soyuz and Vega – are planned to handle both institutional and commercial launches during the year.

It’s not entirely clear how the Ariane 5 could be “Americanized” sufficiently to count as a domestic launch vehicle.

Busy Month of Launches Begins on Saturday

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Zarya, the first component of the International Space Station, launches flawlessly at 1:40 a.m. EST on November 20, 1998, from Kazahkstan (Credit: NASA)

Zarya, the first component of the International Space Station, launches flawlessly at 1:40 a.m. EST on November 20, 1998, from Kazahkstan (Credit: NASA)

A busy launch month begins this weekend with the flight of a Russian Proton rocket from Kazakhstan on Saturday and an early-morning lift-off of a SpaceX Falcon 9 on Sunday carrying a Dragon freighter bound for the International Space Station.

International launch providers are planning 11 launches through April 15.  The U.S. plans four launches while the Russians are planning three, the Europeans two, and India one. One of the European launches will involve a Russian Soyuz rocket that will fly from the European launch base in South America. The final flight during this period will be of a Sea Launch Zenit 3SL rocket, which is a joint Russian-Ukraine program.

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Congressional Cuts Force NASA to Send More Money to Russia

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Soyuz TMA-22 crew in space. (Credit: NASA TV)

Soyuz TMA-22 crew in space. (Credit: NASA TV)

NASA’s bill for crew transportation services to the International Space Station is expected to rise to more than $2 billion with the space agency’s latest decision to extend an agreement with the Russian space agency Roscosmos through the spring of 2018.

NASA plans to purchase six additional seats aboard Russian Soyuz transports for 2017 plus emergency crew rescue services through the spring of 2018. A similar deal the space agency signed last May for 2016 and 2017 cost $424 million, or roughly $70 million per seat. How much the new agreement will cost is unknown, but costs have risen sharply over the past several years.

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Arianespace to Report Small Loss for 2013, Looks Forward to Busy 2014

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An Ariane 5 rocket soars into orbit on Dec. 29, 2010. Credits: ESA / CNES / Arianespace / Photo Optique vidéo du CSG

An Ariane 5 rocket soars into orbit on Dec. 29, 2010. Credits: ESA / CNES / Arianespace / Photo Optique vidéo du CSG

Despite a government subsidy of 100 million euros, Arianespace expects to lose money in 2013 when all the accounts are totalled up. However, the European launch company is looking toward a record breaking year in 2014 as it works through a large manifest, Space News reports.

Arianespace launch consortium expects to report a ‘slight loss’ for 2013 following a revenue drop of some 27 percent compared to 2012 as a result of lower-than-planned launch activity, Arianespace Chief Executive Stephane Israel said Jan. 7.

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Russia 2013 Space Year in Review

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Expedition 37 takes off for the International Space Station. (Credit: NASA)

Expedition 37 takes off for the International Space Station. (Credit: NASA)

By Douglas Messier
Managing Editor

Russia once again led the world in orbital launches in 2013, keeping the International Space Station supplied with a study stream of crew members and cargo while earning hard currency with commercial satellite launches.

Although the vast majority of Russia’s launches were successful, the spectacular failure in July of a Proton rocket — which nosedived into the ground shortly after liftoff — accelerated efforts to reform the nation’s failure-prone space program. By the end of the year, the Russian space agency Roscosmos had a new leader and a major effort was underway to consolidate a large part of the bloated and inefficient space sector under a single government-owned company.

During 2013, Russia introduced a new variant of its venerable Soyuz rocket while also making progress on constructing a new spaceport in the Far East and developing a larger human spacecraft to replace the Soyuz transport and a heavy-lift booster to facilitate deep space exploration.

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China Gets Busy Holiday Launch Season Off to a Good Start

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A Long March 3-B rocket lifts off with China's Chang'e-3 lunar rover. (Credit: CAST)

A Long March 3-B rocket lifts off with China’s Chang’e-3 lunar rover. (Credit: CAST)

UPDATE: SpaceX’s Falcon 9 launch has been shifted to Tuesday evening.

China has kicked off a busy month with the successful launch of the Chang’e-8 lunar rover mission. There are 15 launches on the manifests of the world’s rocket companies in December. If all missions are completed and none are added, there will be 85 orbital launches for the year.

SpaceX is the next to go on Tuesday evening, with the company hoping its third attempt to launch the SES-8 communications satellite is a charm.  The launch window opens at 5:41 p.m. EST, and SpaceX will webcast the attempt.

The company is hoping to get one more launch in by the end of 2013 on Dec. 20 with the Thaicom 6 satellite as the payload. Some other notable launches scheduled for December include:

  • Antares/Cygnus: Orbital Sciences first commercial cargo delivery to the International Space Station (Dec. 17);
  • Soyuz 2-1v:  The first flight of Russia’s “light” version of the venerable booster (Dec. 23);
  • GSLV/GSAT 14:  India will make a re-flight of a cryogenic engine that failed to fire during its inaugural mission in April 2010 (TBD);
  • Long March 4B/CBERS 3: China will launch a Earth resources satellite jointly developed with Brazil (Dec. 10);
  • Atlas V/Delta IV: These two ULA military launches will bring the company’s total to 12 for the year (Dec. 5 & 12);

SCHEDULED LAUNCHES FOR DECEMBER 2013

Date

Launch Vehicle

Launch Site

Nation/Company /Agency

Payload

Result

USA

12/03/13

Falcon 9

CCAFS

USA/SpaceX

SES 8

12/05/13

Atlas V

VAFB

USA/ULA/USAF

NROL-39

12/12/13

Delta IV

CCAFS

USA/ULA/USAF

GPS 2F-5

12/17/13

Antares

MARS

USA/Orbital/NASA

Cygnus 2

12/20/13

Falcon 9

CCAFS

USA/SpaceX

Thaicom 6

RUSSIA

12/08/13

Proton

Baikonur

Russia/ILS

Inmarsat 5

12/19/13

Soyuz

Kourou

Russia/Europe/Arianespace

Gaia

12/23/13

Soyuz 2-1v

Plesetsk

Russia/TsSKB-Progress

AIST & Calibration Spheres

12/26/13

Proton

Baikonur

Russia/ILS

Express AM5

CHINA

12/02/13

Long March 3B

Xichang

China/CNSA

Chang’e-3

Success

12/10/13

Long March 4B

Taiyuan

China/CNSA

CBERS 3

12/20/13

Long March 3B

Xichang

China/CNSA

Tupac Katari

TBD

Long March 4B

Taiyuan

China/CSNA

Gaofen 2

INDIA

TBD

GSLV

Satish Dhawan

India/ISRO

GSAT 14

JAPAN

TBD

H-2A

Tanegashima

Japan/Mitsubishi
/JAXA

ALOS 2

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Busy Launch Week Begins on Monday with MAVEN Flight

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Launch of Atlas V NRO satellite on June 20, 2012. (Credit: ULA)

Launch of Atlas V NRO satellite on June 20, 2012. (Credit: ULA)

The numbers are impressive.

  • 6 launches
  • 6 launch vehicles
  • ~ 40 satellites
  • 5 spaceports
  • 4 nations
  • 7 days.

That is the week in rocketry that will begin on Monday. The highlights include:

  • NASA’s MAVEN orbiter will study Mars’ atmosphere and climate (Monday, Nov. 18 at 1:28 p.m. EST — Cape Canaveral, Florida );
  • Minotaur I will set a new record for the number of satellites launched into space with by sending the military’s STPSat 3 and 29 CubeSats into orbit (Tuesday, Nov. 19 from 7:30 to 9:15 pm EST — Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, Virginia);
  • SpaceX will attempt to put its first communications satellite into geosynchronous orbit using its upgraded Falcon 9 rocket (Monday, Nov. 25 at 5:37 pm EST — Cape Canaveral, Florida).

Three additional launches will take place from Russia and Kazakhstan over that 7-day period. A table with all scheduled launches is below along with a map showing East Coast residents how they can view Minotaur I’s night launch on Tuesday.

Continue reading ‘Busy Launch Week Begins on Monday with MAVEN Flight’