GMV Joins Net Zero Space Initiative to Eliminate Space Debris

  • The use of outer space and the more than $1 trillion in benefits estimated for 2030 is threatened by rising orbital pollution
  • There is an urgent need for all stakeholders in the space market to reach a consensus on its safe and sustainable use
  • GMV is a world reference in the study, monitoring and prevention of space debris proliferation, with more than 20 years of experience in this market

MADRID, Spain (GMV PR) — The space environment is becoming increasingly polluted due to the proliferation of objects orbiting in an uncontrolled manner around the earth, particularly in low and geostationary orbits (the most interesting for use and exploitation). Estimates suggest that there are more than one million objects larger than 1 cm capable of causing potential damage of various kinds, and the number is increasing at a dangerous rate. To ensure a sustainable use of space, various key players in the space industry (*), including GMV, have launched the international initiative called Net Zero Space.

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Net Zero Space Declaration Nets 11 Signatories

The scales of the space debris problem (Credit: ESA)

Eleven space stakeholders have pledged themselves to avoiding the future generation of space debris and remediating the junk that is already clogging up Earth orbit by signing the Net Zero Space Declaration last week.

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Like a Tow-hook for Satellites: Astroscale Launches Docking Plate to Capture Defunct Satellites

PARIS (Astroscale PR) — Astroscale Holdings Inc. (“Astroscale”), the market leader in satellite servicing and long-term orbital sustainability across all orbits, today revealed a universal docking device the company hopes will become standard fitment on all future low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. Following on from the COP26 climate conference, Paris Peace Forum Net Zero Space Declaration, and the G7 statement on space sustainability, Astroscale calls on operators to prepare their spacecraft with a Docking Plate to prepare for future removal and to help safeguard the space environment.

There are an unprecedented number of satellites due to launch over the next decade, the majority into LEO, (250km to 2000km above Earth). The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has approved 16,447 satellites within constellations to date and has applications pending for an additional 64,816 satellites. The potential for high-velocity, high impact collisions is likely to increase unless disposal of satellites becomes part of everyday space operations.

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