Tag: NASA

Russia Commits to Operating International Space Station Until 2024

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Credit: NASA

Credit: NASA

Some good news for NASA came last week when the Russian government formally committed to operating the International Space Station until 2024. The orbiting facility had been previously slated to be decommissioned in 2020.

The Russian space agency Roscosmos is reportedly to have fought hard for the four-year extension despite tensions between the United States and Russia over Ukraine.

Earlier this year, the Canadian government agreed to continue participating in the program until 2024. The European Space Agency and Japanese government have made similar commitments yet. Japan is widely expected to sign on to the extension.

 

CubeSat to Study Solar Particles Set for EM-1 Launch

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CuSPP+ (Credit: SwRI)

CuSPP+ (Credit: SwRI)

GREENBELT, Md. (NASA PR) —  Another CubeSat mission involving significant contributions from Goddard scientists has won a berth on NASA’s Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) in 2018. The pint-size spacecraft will be one of the first to venture into interplanetary space.

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Lunar IceCube Wins Slot on Exploration Mission-1

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Goddard scientists Avi Mandell and Dennis Reuter are developing the BIRCHES instrument for the new Lunar IceCube mission. (Credit: NASA)

Goddard scientists Avi Mandell and Dennis Reuter are developing the BIRCHES instrument for the new Lunar IceCube mission. (Credit: NASA)

GREENBELT, Md. (NASA PR) — Lunar IceCube has won a coveted slot as one of 12 diminutive secondary payloads to deploy during the first planned flight in 2018 of NASA’s next-generation Space Launch System (SLS) and the second for its Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle — an event that scientists say will signal a paradigm shift in interplanetary science.

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Q&A With NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate Chief Steve Jurczyk

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Steve Jurczyk (Credit: NASA)

Steve Jurczyk (Credit: NASA)


WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — Earlier this year, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden named Steve Jurczyk as the agency’s associate administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

Jurczyk and technology have long been linked given that his career began in 1988 at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. A skillful and well-recognized engineer, his talents led to key leadership positions at Langley including deputy center director prior to becoming center director.

During his tenure at Langley, Jurczyk shaped the direction of research and technology endeavors in a wide array of areas, from aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and acoustics to structures, materials and airborne systems – all in support of NASA’s aeronautics, exploration systems, science and space operations. Continue reading ‘Q&A With NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate Chief Steve Jurczyk’

Robotic Refueling Mission Continues on ISS

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RRM operations demonstrate satellite-servicing technologies using the RRM module (right) and the Dextre robot (top center). Behind them, the ISS solar array is visible. (Credit: NASA)

RRM operations demonstrate satellite-servicing technologies using the RRM module (right) and the Dextre robot (top center). Behind them, the ISS solar array is visible. (Credit: NASA)

GREENBELT, Md. (NASA PR) — It’s back, it’s updated, and it’s making great progress – all on the International Space Station (ISS).

NASA’s Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM), a groundbreaking demonstration of new satellite-servicing technologies and techniques, recently resumed operations on the space station after a two-year hiatus. Within five days, the RRM team had outfitted the RRM module with fresh hardware for a series of technology demonstrations and tested a new, multi-capability inspection tool.

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Study: Returning Astronauts to Moon Cheaper Than Thought

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The moon rising over Half Moon Bay, California on Halloween 2009. (Credit: Douglas Messier)

The moon rising over Half Moon Bay, California on Halloween 2009. (Credit: Douglas Messier)

A new study published last week has put forth an “Evolvable Lunar Architecture” (ELA) that it claims would reduce the projected cost a returning humans to the moon by up to 90 percent.

The study, “Economic Assessment and Systems Analysis of an Evolvable Lunar Architecture that Leverages Commercial Space Capabilities and Public-Private-Partnerships,” finds that the  projected cost of returning to the moon could be reduced from about $100 billion to about $10 billion (plus or minus 30 percent) using private-public partnerships that leverage emerging commercial capabilities.

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GLXP News: Earthrise Space Tests Out Rover at NASA Facility

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Sagan performing mobility tests in NASA Lunar Regolith Bin. (Credit: ESF)

Sagan performing mobility tests in NASA Lunar Regolith Bin. (Credit: ESF)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. (ESF PR) – Earthrise Space Foundation (ESF) recently ventured out to Cape Canaveral to perform a series of tests on Sagan in NASA’s very own Lunar Regolith Bin.

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NASA’s New Horizons Team Finds Haze, Flowing Ice on Pluto

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Backlit by the sun, Pluto’s atmosphere rings its silhouette like a luminous halo in this image taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft around midnight EDT on July 15. This global portrait of the atmosphere was captured when the spacecraft was about 1.25 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Pluto and shows structures as small as 12 miles across. The image, delivered to Earth on July 23, is displayed with north at the top of the frame. (Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Backlit by the sun, Pluto’s atmosphere rings its silhouette like a luminous halo in this image taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft around midnight EDT on July 15. This global portrait of the atmosphere was captured when the spacecraft was about 1.25 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Pluto and shows structures as small as 12 miles across. The image, delivered to Earth on July 23, is displayed with north at the top of the frame. (Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

LAUREL, Md. (NASA PR) — Flowing ice and a surprising extended haze are among the newest discoveries from NASA’s New Horizons mission, which reveal distant Pluto to be an icy world of wonders.

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Pluto’s Mountains Continue to Astound

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Mountains on Pluto. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI)

Mountains on Pluto. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI)

LAUREL, Md. (NASA PR) — A newly discovered mountain range lies near the southwestern margin of Pluto’s Tombaugh Regio (Tombaugh Region), situated between bright, icy plains and dark, heavily-cratered terrain. This image was acquired by New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on July 14, 2015 from a distance of 48,000 miles (77,000 kilometers) and sent back to Earth on July 20. Features as small as a half-mile (1 kilometer) across are visible.

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New Photos of Pluto’s Moons Nix & Hydra

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Pluto's moons Nix and Hydra. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI)

Pluto’s moons Nix and Hydra. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI)

LAUREL, Md. (NASA PR) — Pluto has five known moons. In order of distance from Pluto they are: Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra.

While Pluto’s largest moon Charon has grabbed most of the lunar spotlight, two of Pluto’s smaller and lesser-known satellites are starting to come into focus via new images from the New Horizons spacecraft. Nix and Hydra – the second and third moons to be discovered – are approximately the same size, but their similarity ends there.

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