Tag: Mars Phoenix

NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander Will Not Rise Again

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Two images of the Phoenix Mars lander taken from Martian orbit in 2008 and 2010. The 2008 lander image shows two relatively blue spots on either side corresponding to the spacecraft's clean circular solar panels. In the 2010 image scientists see a dark shadow that could be the lander body and eastern solar panel, but no shadow from the western solar panel. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Two images of the Phoenix Mars lander taken from Martian orbit in 2008 and 2010. The 2008 lander image shows two relatively blue spots on either side corresponding to the spacecraft's clean circular solar panels. In the 2010 image scientists see a dark shadow that could be the lander body and eastern solar panel, but no shadow from the western solar panel. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

NASA MISSION UPDATE

NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander has ended operations after repeated attempts to contact the spacecraft were unsuccessful. A new image transmitted by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows signs of severe ice damage to the lander’s solar panels.

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Best of What’s New: WhiteKnightTwo, Phoenix, Rocket Racer and GeoEye

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Popular Science has named its Best of What’s New 2008 lists for the year’s top technological achievements. NASA’s Mars Phoenix Lander has been named Grand Award winner in the Aviation & Space category. The spacecraft spent more than five months analyzing soil and conditions near the martian north pole.

Other space- and rocket-related products on the list include:

  • Scaled Composites’ WhiteKnightTwo, which will carry SpaceShipTwo aloft;
  • Rocket Racing League’s X Racer;
  • GeoEye-1 remote sensing satellite;
  • JAXA Kizuna broadband satellite;
  • Martin Aircraft Company’s jet backpack;
  • Large Binocular Telescope.

It’s Dead, Jim: Mars Phoenix Posts Goodbye Blog Message

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The Mars Phoenix Lander has succumbed to the deadly cold of the Martian north pole. Farewell, Phoenix. You’ve served us well.  And congratulations to JPL, the University of Arizona and all the international partners on a job well done. Bravo.

This is My Farewell Transmission From Mars
Gizmodo

“If you are reading this, then my mission is probably over.

“This final entry is one that I asked be posted after my mission team announces they’ve lost contact with me. Today is that day and I must say good-bye, but I do it in triumph and not in grief.

“As I’ve said before, there’s no other place I’d rather be than here. My mission lasted five months instead of three, and I’m content knowing that I worked hard and accomplished great things during that time. My work here is done, but I leave behind a legacy of images and data….”

Weakened Phoenix Lander Still Phoning Home

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NASA MISSION UPDATE

NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander has communicated with controllers daily since Oct. 30 through relays to Mars orbiters. Information received over the weekend indicates Phoenix is running out of power each afternoon or evening but reawakening after its solar arrays catch morning sunlight.

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Canadian Government Silenced Scientists on Martian Snow Discovery

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‘In space, no one can hear you … ‘
The Ottawa Citizen

“Canadian scientists knew snow was falling on the Red Planet, but the country’s space agency wasn’t allowed to spread the news, reports Tom Spears….

“It should have been a proud Canadian moment in space as our first mission to Mars made a surprising discovery this fall: Snow is falling on the Red Planet. But the Canadian Space Agency wasn’t allowed to talk about its achievement, because its staff was muzzled during the federal election.”

NASA’s Phoenix Lander Finishes Scooping Up Soil

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This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) of NASA’s Phoenix Lander, shows Martian soil piled on top of the spacecraft’s deck and some of its instruments.

NASA MISSION UPDATE
21 October 2008

NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander has finished scooping soil samples to deliver to its onboard laboratories, and is now preparing to analyze samples already obtained. Scientists are anxious to analyze the samples as the power Phoenix generates continues to drop. The amount of sunlight is waning on Mars’ northern plains as late-summer turns to fall.

The spacecraft’s robotic arm is digging into the lower portion of the “Upper Cupboard” and “Stone Soup” areas of the Phoenix worksite. Its Surface Stereoscopic Imager is taking photos of this trenching so scientists can better map out the geology of the Red Planet’s ice table.

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The Sun Rises at the Martian North Pole

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NASA MISSION UPDATE

This sequence of nine images taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander shows the sun rising on the morning of the lander’s 101st Martian day after landing.

The images were taken on Sept. 5, 2008. The local solar times at the landing site for the nine images were between 1:23 a.m. and 1:41 a.m.

The landing site is on far-northern Mars, and the mission started in late northern spring. For nearly the entire first 90 Martian days of the mission, the sun never set below the horizon. As the amount of sunshine each day declined steadily after that, so has the amount of electricity available for the solar-powered spacecraft.

Let it Snow, Let it Snow, Let it Snow….

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Snow is the surprising forecast for Mars
Los Angeles Times

“The latest forecast on Mars calls for morning fog and swift-moving clouds — along with light snow.

Snowman courtesy of Bigfoto.com

“The surprising weather report was part of the latest scientific findings from NASA’s Phoenix lander, which has been taking measurements at the Martian north pole since May 25.

“At a press briefing Monday at NASA headquarters in Washington and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, scientists said the discovery of snow on Mars was made by an instrument that shined a laser into clouds about two miles above the ground, revealing the presence of ice crystals.”

NASA Mars Lander Sees Falling Snow, Soil Data Suggest Liquid Past
NASA MISSION UPDATE
29 September 2008

PASADENA, Calif. — NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander has detected snow falling from Martian clouds. Spacecraft soil experiments also have provided evidence of past interaction between minerals and liquid water, processes that occur on Earth.

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More Soil Delivered to Phoenix Lab

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NASA MISSION UPDATE

This image, taken by NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander’s Surface Stereo Imager, documents the delivery of a soil sample from the “Snow White” trench to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory. A small pile of soil is visible on the lower edge of the second cell from the top.This deck-mounted lab is part of Phoenix’s Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA).

The delivery was made on Sept. 12, 2008, which was Sol 107 (the 107th Martian day) of the mission, which landed on May 25, 2008.

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Sunrise on Mars

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NASA MISSION UPDATE

From the location of NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander, above the Martian arctic circle, the sun does not set during the peak of the Martian summer.

This period of maximum solar energy is past — on Sol 86, the 86th Martian day after the Phoenix landing, the sun fully set behind a slight rise to the north for about half an hour.

This red-filter image taken by the lander’s Surface Stereo Imager, shows the sun rising on the morning of sol 90, Aug. 25, 2008, the last day of the Phoenix nominal mission.

The image was taken at 51 minutes past midnight local solar time during the slow sunrise that followed a 75 minute “night.” The skylight in the image is light scattered off atmospheric dust particles and ice crystals.

The setting sun does not mean the end of the mission. In late July, the Phoenix Mission was extended through September, rather than the 90-sol duration originally planned as the prime mission.