NASA Extends Contract for Commercialization of Low-Earth Orbit

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — NASA has extended a contract to companies around the United States to provide spaceflight hardware, software, and mission integration and operations services on a commercial basis for the agency’s International Space Station Program in support of the commercialization of low-Earth orbit.

This Research, Engineering, Mission Integration Services Contract (REMIS) contract funded by the International Space Station Program supports NASA’s Strategic Plan for the Commercialization of Low-Earth Orbit. The plan seeks to foster the development of a robust, self-sustaining, and cost-effective supply of United States commercial services to, in, and from low-Earth orbit that accommodates both public and private demands.

REMIS is a multiple award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with firm-fixed-price and cost-plus-fixed-fee task orders. The contract’s base period began Sept. 6, 2017, and runs through Sept. 5, 2022. NASA will extend the contract by exercising a two-year option. The maximum potential value of the contract, including all options and incentives, is $500 million.

The companies that have been awarded this contract are:

  • Barrios Technology LTD of Houston.
  • Boeing of Houston.
  • Craig Technologies of Merritt Island, Florida.
  • CSS of Fairfax, Virginia.
  • KBRwyle of Houston.
  • LEIDOS Innovation Corporation (LEIDOS) of Webster, Texas.
  • MEI Technologies Inc. of Houston.
  • Oceaneering Space Systems Division of Houston.
  • Sierra Nevada Corporation of Sparks, Nevada.
  • Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies of Greenbelt, Maryland.
  • Techshot, Inc. of Greenville, Indiana.
  • Tec-Masters, Inc. of Huntsville, Alabama.
  • Teledyne Brown Engineering Inc. of Huntsville, Alabama.
  • The University of Colorado (BioServe Space Technologies) of Boulder, Colorado.
  • ZIN Technologies Inc. of Middleburg Heights, Ohio.

The awardees will perform work under the contract at their respective sites unless otherwise specified in the task order.

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit: 

http://www.nasa.gov

NASA Awards Contract for Intelligent Systems Research

MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. (NASA PR) — NASA has selected Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, LLC, a KBRwyle business unit, of Greenbelt, Maryland, for a contract for intelligent systems research and development support services at the agency’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California.

This is a cost-plus-fixed-fee (CPFF) hybrid contract consisting of firm-fixed-price (FFP) contract line item numbers (CLINs) for phase-in and core management requirements; and CPFF or FFP CLINs for core technical and indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity requirements. It will begin on March 15 with a 60-day phase-in period followed by a two-year base period and three two-year options. The contract has a maximum value of $400 million.

The contractor will provide resources and technical expertise to support the Intelligent Systems Division on scientific research, technologies and applications development in a variety of research domains and infusion of advanced information systems technology on NASA missions and other projects within the federal government.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov

NASA-Funded LEO Commercialization Studies Yield Diverse Results

Credit: Axiom Space

Last week, NASA released the results of low Earth orbit (LEO) commercialization studies the space agency commissioned 12 companies to conduct. The space agency is looking to become a tenant in LEO as it aims to return astronauts to the moon in 2024.

Credit: Blue Origin

The studies were conducted by a diverse group of companies ranging from big aerospace such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman to up and comers like Blue Origin and NanoRacks to business consultants Deloitte and McKinsey&Company.
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Study Input Informs NASA Course for a Vibrant Future Commercial Space Economy

International Space Station (Credit: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — New insights from companies in the growing space economy are helping NASA chart a course for the future of commercial human spaceflight in low-Earth orbit. Input the companies provided to NASA as part of the studies will inform NASA’s future policies to support commercial activities that enable a robust low-Earth orbit economy.

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Spaceflight Changes Your Brain Pathways

The International Space Station as it appears in 2018. Zarya is visible at the center of the complex, identifiable by its partially retracted solar arrays. (Credit: NASA)

by Alisson Clark
University of Florida

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (University of Florida PR) — Brain scans of astronauts before and after spaceflight show changes to their white matter in areas that control movement and process sensory information, a University of Florida study shows.

The deterioration was the same type you’d expect to see with aging, but happened over a much shorter period of time. The findings could help explain why some astronauts have balance and coordination problems after returning to Earth, said Rachael Seidler, a professor with UF’s College of Health and Human Performance.

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