Genes in Space National STEM Competition Finalists Compete to Launch Experiment to Space

Winning student experiment will be carried out on the International Space Station

NASA astronaut Nick Hague works with the miniPCR bio DNA replicator aboard the International Space Station in 2019 to perform the Genes in Space-6 experiment. The results of the Boeing-sponsored student research were published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. (Credit: NASA)

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Genes in Space PR) — Five teams of high school students were named finalists in the Genes in Space annual science competition, which challenges students from grades 7 through 12 to propose DNA analysis experiments that address real-life space exploration challenges. Founded by Boeing and miniPCR bio, Genes in Space works with the winning team to have the experiment performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This year, 602 teams submitted proposals to the competition.

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Scientists Take First Ever Image of a Black Hole

Video Caption: A global team of astronomers, led by Harvard scientists, have captured an image of a black hole for the first time. The result of a massive, years-long effort by dozens of researchers, the Event Horizon Telescope focused on a pair of supermassive black holes – the one at the center of the Milky Way galaxy, known as Sagittarius A*, and a second that lies at the heart of an elliptical galaxy called M87. The work opens the door to allowing astronomers and physicists to put Einstein’s theories of gravity and general relativity to the test under the most extreme conditions in the universe.

Scientists have captured the first-ever image of a black hole. It is outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity. (Credit: EHT collaboration)

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NASA Selects Two New Space Tech Research Institutes for Smart Habitats

Habitation concept interior. (Credit: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — As exploration missions venture beyond low-Earth orbit and to the Moon — and eventually Mars — NASA must consider automated technologies to keep habitats operational even when they are not occupied by astronauts. To help achieve this, NASA has selected two new Space Technology Research Institutes (STRIs) to advance space habitat designs using resilient and autonomous systems.

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