This Week on the Space Show

This week on The Space Show with Dr. David Livingston:

Tuesday, July 19 — 7 PM PDT (9 PM CDT; 10 PM EDT): Guests: Dr. Daniel Tompkins Bioplastic machines to grow greenhouses in space. Self-replicating living structures

Wednesday, July 20 — 10 PM PDT (12 AM CDT; 1 AM EDT): Hotel Mars with Harold C. Connolly Jr. Guests: John BatchelorDr. David LivingstonDr. Harold C. Connolly Jr. Is Bennu a rubble pile?

Thursday, July 21 — 10AM PDT (12 PM- CDT; 1 PM EDT): Guests: Lori Garver Lori talks her new book, “Escaping Gravity.” Give her a call.

Friday, July 22 — 9:30 PDT (11:30 AM CDT; 12:30 EDT): Guests: Mike Snead The USAF as an aerospace force and much more

Sunday, July 24 — 12 PM PDT (3 PM EDT; 2 PM CDT): Guests: Dr. Christopher Morrison nuclear propulsion advances, nuclear power, fusion and more

Q&A: Former NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver Talks Commercial Space, ‘Bro’ Culture and Her New Book

NASA then-Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin for the dedication of the Spaceport America runway in 2010. (Credit: Douglas Messier)

by David Bullock
Staff Writer

Former Deputy Administrator of NASA Lori Garver came out with a new book in June titled, “Escaping Gravity: My Quest to Transform NASA and Launch a New Space Age.” The book is a memoir of her time in the space sector, particularly focused on her time in the Obama Administration where she spearheaded commercialization efforts. Here, we talk about the book and other topics about the government organization and the private sector.

Q. What is the most important thing(s) you want readers to take away from your book?

I think that the value of humans first exploring space was most directly tied to looking back and seeing our home planet and recognizing we are in this together. We often envision space being about just going to somewhere else, but we have learned so much about ourselves and our planet from just going to space. I would like people to recognize that the government program can focus on those priorities and reduce the cost of accessibility to space, so even more people, satellites can go to space for valuable purposes.

How has the move toward commercial space you led helped the U.S. space program?

NASA has always had commercial industry involved in our space program very closely. What we have been starting, decades before, was recognizing the things that are routine about space could be done by the private sector in ways that reduce the cost through innovation and opening new markets. Lowering the cost of space transportation by some of the policies that I helped drive has allowed us to take better advantage of the unique vantage of space and allowed NASA to focus, or should allow even more, NASA to focus on things that are uniquely important to the government.

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