Tag: asteroids

JAXA Testing Deep Space Microsat With Asteroid Flyby

Comments
PROCYON (Credit: JAXA)

PROCYON (Credit: JAXA)

With all the attention that JAXA’s recently launched Hayabusa2 soil sample return mission has received, a secondary spacecraft sent into space along with it on Dec. 3 has been largely overlooked despite its ambitious objectives.

PROCYON, which stands for PRoximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation, is a 65-kg (143 lb.) spacecraft designed to demonstrate that micro-satellites can be used for deep-space exploration. In addition to testing out micro-sat systems in deep space, the spacecraft is to conduct a close flyby of an asteroid.

Continue reading ‘JAXA Testing Deep Space Microsat With Asteroid Flyby’

NASA Cooperating With JAXA on Hayabusa2 Science

Comments
Hayabusa-2 (Credit: JAXA)

Hayabusa-2 (Credit: JAXA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — NASA and space agencies across the globe are opening up new possibilities for space exploration with missions to comets, asteroids, and other celestial bodies.

Following NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), and Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) spacecraft observations of the close flyby of Mars by comet Siding Spring in October, and the successful November landing of ESA’s Philae lander on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) successfully launched its Hayabusa2 mission on Dec. 3 to rendezvous with an asteroid, land a small probe plus three mini rovers on its surface, and then return samples to Earth.

Continue reading ‘NASA Cooperating With JAXA on Hayabusa2 Science’

Hayabusa2 on its Way to a Rendezvous With an Asteroid

Comment
Hayabusa2 launch aboard a H-2A rocket (Credit: JAXA)

Hayabusa2 launch aboard a H-2A rocket (Credit: JAXA)

TOKYO (JAXA PR) – Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) successfully launched the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 26 (H-IIA F26) with the Asteroid Explorer “Hayabusa2″ onboard at 1:22:04 p.m. on December 3, 2014 (Japan Standard Time, JST) from the Tanegashima Space Center.

The launch vehicle flew as planned, and at approximately one hour, 47 minutes and 21 seconds after liftoff, the separation of the Hayabusa2 to earth-escape trajectory was confirmed.

JAXA received signals from the Asteroid Explorer “Hayabusa2″ at 3:44 p.m. on December 3, 2014 (Japan Standard Time) at the NASA Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex (in California) and confirmed that its initial sequence of operations including the solar array paddle deployment and sun acquisition control have been performed normally.

The explorer is now in a stable condition.

The Asteroid Explorer “Hayabusa2″ is a successor to the “Hayabusa”, which verified various new exploration technologies and returned to Earth in June 2010. The “Hayabusa2″ is setting out on a journey to clarify the origin and evolution of the solar system as well as life matter. The “Hayabusa2″ will find out more about the world.

http://global.jaxa.jp/projects/sat/hayabusa2/index.html

With a launch success rate for H-IIA/B launch vehicles at 96.7%, this launch confirms the quality and reliability of the H-IIA/B.

We would like to express our profound appreciation for the cooperation and support of all related personnel and organizations that helped contribute to the successful launch of the H-IIA F26.

Webcast Schedule Set for Hayabusa2 Launch

Comments
Hayabusa-2 (Credit: JAXA)

Hayabusa-2 (Credit: JAXA)

JAXA will broadcast the launch of the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 26 with the Hayabusa2 onboard from the Tanegashima Space Center through the Internet. The report will cover launch events from the liftoff to the payload separation from the launch vehicle.

Launch Date & Time:

Wednesday, Dec. 3 — 1:22:04 p.m. JST
(Tuesday, Dec. 2 — 11:22:04 p.m. EST)

Broadcast Schedule

Part I [Prior and after liftoff of H-IIA F26/Hayabusa2]

Wednesday, Dec. 3 — 12:25 p.m. thru 1:40 p.m. JST (75 minutes)
(Tuesday, Dec. 2 — 10:25 p.m. thru 11:40 p.m. EST)

Part II [Prior to and after the Hayabusa2’s separation from the launch vehicle]

Wednesday, Dec. 3 — 2:55 p.m. to 3:25 p.m. JST (30 minutes)
(Wednesday, Dec. 3 — 12:55 a.m. to 1:25 a.m. EST)

DSI Forms Strategic Partnership With Solid Prototype, Inc.

Comments
 Deep Space Industries is planning a series of reconnaissance spacecraft which will be sent in search of mineral-rich asteroids.  (Credit:  Bryan Versteeg, Deep Space Industries)

Deep Space Industries is planning a series of reconnaissance spacecraft which will be sent in search of mineral-rich asteroids. (Credit: Bryan Versteeg, Deep Space Industries)

Houston, TXDecember 1, 2014.  Deep Space Industries and Solid Prototype Inc. today announced a strategic partnership to revolutionize spacecraft design and production through Solid Prototype’s 3D printing services, targeted at reducing fabrication costs, speeding turnaround times for new designs, and eliminating mass from spacecraft structures.

Continue reading ‘DSI Forms Strategic Partnership With Solid Prototype, Inc.’

Hayabusa-2 Asteroid Mission Postponed Until Wednesday

Comments
Hayabusa-2 (Credit: JAXA)

Hayabusa-2 (Credit: JAXA)

Editor’s Note: There has been another launch delay to Wednesday due to weather.

TOKYO (JAXA PR) – Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) decided to launch the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 26 (H-IIA F26) with the Asteroid Explorer “Hayabusa2″ onboard in the following schedule.

Continue reading ‘Hayabusa-2 Asteroid Mission Postponed Until Wednesday’

NASA Announces New Opportunities for Public Participation in Asteroid Grand Challenge

Comments

NASA LOGOWASHINGTON (NASA PR) — Ten new projects are providing opportunities for the public to participate in NASA’s Asteroid Grand Challenge, which accelerates the agency’s asteroid initiative work through innovative partnerships and collaborations.

The 10 new projects developed by SpaceGAMBIT were done in partnership with Maui Makers – a group that provides the space and tools to make new things on the island of Maui in Hawaii.

“SpaceGAMBIT and their partners have created an incredibly wide variety of projects that speak to the strong interest in asteroids and passion of the public to participate in space-related activities,” said Jason Kessler, program executive for the Asteroid Grand Challenge. “These projects will inspire NASA audiences and the broader community to learn and get involved.”

Continue reading ‘NASA Announces New Opportunities for Public Participation in Asteroid Grand Challenge’

NASA Asteroid Retrieval Mission Begins to Identify Targets

33 Comments
Asteroid Retrieval Mission (Credit: NASA)

Asteroid Retrieval Mission (Credit: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — NASA is on the hunt to add potential candidate target asteroids for the agency’s Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). The robotic mission will identify, capture and redirect a near-Earth asteroid to a stable orbit around the moon. In the 2020s, astronauts will explore the asteroid and return to Earth with samples. This will test and advance new technologies and spaceflight experience needed to take humans to Mars in the 2030s.

Continue reading ‘NASA Asteroid Retrieval Mission Begins to Identify Targets’

NASA Agrees to Revamp NEO Program in Wake of Critical OIG Report

Comments
Asteroid Eros

Asteroid Eros

Somewhere out there in the cosmos, there’s a giant rock with Earth’s name on it. Despite the danger, NASA’s effort to identify potentially dangerous near Earth objects and figure out what to do about them is disorganized and poorly managed, an internal audit has found.

“NASA has organized its NEO Program under a single Program Executive who manages a loosely structured conglomerate of research activities that are not well integrated and lack overarching Program oversight, objectives, and established milestones to track progress,” according to an audit issued Monday by NASA’s Office of Inspector General (OIG).

Continue reading ‘NASA Agrees to Revamp NEO Program in Wake of Critical OIG Report’

Planetary Resources Adds Dante Lauretta to Team

Comments

planetary_resources
REDMOND, Wash., September 9, 2014 (Planetary Resources PR) –
Planetary Resources, Inc., the asteroid mining company, announced today that Dante Lauretta, Ph.D., professor of Planetary Science at the University of Arizona and principal investigator of OSIRIS-REx – NASA’s first asteroid sample return mission – scheduled to launch in 2016 and rendezvous with asteroid Bennu, has joined the company as a science advisor.

Continue reading ‘Planetary Resources Adds Dante Lauretta to Team’