GeoOptics Announces New European Subsidiary, Expands Global Satellite Services

PASADENA, Calif. (GeoOptics PR) — A global leader in Earth remote sensing, GeoOptics announced its expansion in Europe, with founder and chief technology officer, Tom Yunck, relocating to Lausanne, Switzerland, to manage GeoOptics Switzerland SA. The new subsidiary and team of data scientists represent a key component of GeoOptics plans to enhance their commercial satellite services around the globe.

As a pioneer in commercial remote sensing data services, GeoOptics supports decision makers, research groups, and individual users worldwide,” Yunck noted. “Our European office will help us better serve an international base of government and civil customers with the most accurate, timely data available.”

GeoOptics has a new generation of satellites under construction in Italy as part of its long-term partnership with a leader in global satellite solutions. The first two next-generation spacecraft are due to launch in Summer 2022.

“Our strategic satellite manufacturing partnership enables GeoOptics to provide advanced solutions, increased data accuracy, and expanded capabilities from global navigation satellite systems around the globe,” said Alex Saltman, Chief Executive Officer of GeoOptics.

The company also announced today the rollout of Galileo-derived radio occultation data on its current and future satellites, marking the first availability of high accuracy, commercial RO data from the European positioning system. Combined with RO data derived from GPS and GLONASS, GeoOptics continues to offer the highest quality commercial RO data in the world.

Finally, GeoOptics announced a radio occultation (RO) data testing program with EUMETSAT, the European operational satellite agency for monitoring weather, climate, and the environment. EUMETSAT atmospheric data scientists continue to provide strategic feedback and positive reviews on GeoOptics RO data, echoing previous analysis from NOAA. The collaboration will allow EUMETSAT and European meteorological agencies to examine the data.

In July, GeoOptics announced a major upgrade to its CICERO constellation of satellites. With launches beginning next year, CICERO 2 will form a unified Earth observatory allowing stakeholders around the globe – including governments, industry, and individuals — to monitor and prepare for the growing impacts of climate change.