Roscosmos to NASA: Explain Yourself Over Rogozin Slight

Roscosmos head Dmitry Rogozin. (Credit: A. Savin)

MOSCOW (Roscosmos PR) — Roscosmos is waiting for official explanations of the NASA position on the organization of the return visit of the Russian delegation to the United States in accordance with the previously received invitation.

The preparation of the negotiating position of the state corporation for cooperation of the parties on the program of the International Space Station and deep space has not yet been suspended.

Translated from Russian using Google Translate.

Editor’s Note: The statement is in response to NASA cancelling a planned visit next month by Roscosmos General Director Dmitry Rogozin. NASA is seeking Russian cooperation on the Deep Space Gateway. Members of Congress also want to extend ISS operations beyond 2024 — which would be a lot more feasible if Russia agrees.

Rogozin has said Russia could turn to China if Roscosmos is not a full partners on the gateway. The decision to rescind the invitation, which came after sharp criticism from Capitol Hill because Rogozin is on a sanctions list over the Russian annexation of Crimea, will not help U.S. efforts to cooperate with Roscosmos.

Stay tuned. Turbulence ahead.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    I have to say, I can’t blame the Russians. The invitation was right up there with Bolden’s faux-up’d interview on Al Jazeera. It’s one thing to say your #1 job is to excite little muslum children about space travel, it’s quite another to not be cognizant of the Venn diagram that encompasses your policy, the policy of the US Congress, and that of the administration.

  • duheagle

    Definitely an unforced error on Bridenstine’s part. Never give Russians an excuse for deflections from matters that are actually important. These people are like American street gangsters in their aversion to being “dissed.” Overall, Mr. B has done a very good job since taking office, but this incident isn’t going to help his batting average at all.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    I’l agree he’s STARTED some good things. I’m watching the carry thru.

  • duheagle

    As are we all, but credit where it’s due as well as blame.

    I think the Russians are unlikely, as a reaction to the slight dealt Rogozin, to actually scupper the ISS “early,” abandon the possibility of being part of the Gateway program or irrevocably cast their future spacefaring lot with the Chinese – all of which are hinted at in their statement here. But, as I would see any or all of said developments as unalloyed Good Things for the U.S., if the Russians actually do any of these things, then Bridenstine’s apparent faux pas will have to be retroactively seen as a master stroke whether intentional or not. I just don’t see the Russians actually saving his bacon in any of these fashions, let alone all three.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    Beyond an exchange of insults, Russia has a very weak hand. We COULD if we wanted to replace the Russian modules. Russia is screwed without the ISS, and would become even more isolated from the rest of the world. I doubt much beyond the diplomatic equiv of a good ribbing comes of this.

  • Robert G. Oler

    go deal with the Chinese…see how much money they give yo9u

  • Robert G. Oler

    the administrator is a child

  • Robert G. Oler

    a new president will replace the Russian modules

  • Saturn1300

    Everybody having fun? It’s just the shutdown. Traveling to everyone’s house is a drag. Just going office to office is easy. It is just me, but I see tricking him to come here is more punishment. A lot of trouble and work. But that is his job.

  • duheagle

    I don’t think your ceaseless flogging of that meme is going to make it stick.

  • duheagle

    Yes. The Russkies will do their usual offended dignity dance for awhile, then quietly drop the act when they see it isn’t getting them anywhere.

  • duheagle

    Really? Obama failed to seize any such “opportunity.” The President we’ve got now seems likelier to de-orbit ISS in 2024 than rehab it.

    So which new President would that be, pray tell? President Warren? President Garcetti? President Booker? President Harris? President AOC?

    You can’t reasonably expect to replace something with nothing. And the Democrats have a “bench” consisting entirely of Struldbrugs and nobodies.

  • windbourne

    Russia has a weak hand NOW. For the last 15 years, it was us with a weak hand, esp due to Congress, and they did not bail on us.

    I really do not want to see us be a bad partner. Other nations will see that for what it is.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    Unless the Russians really decide to leave the station, I’d doubt it. The dependency on the Russians is very much a part of the diplomacy. It demonstrates intent in a way the Russians understand.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    In this case that comes shining thru.

  • Andrew_M_Swallow

    In 5 years time it will be easier to make an all American spacestation by attaching a Power and Propulsion Element to a Bigelow B330.

  • Steve

    The next NASA administrator will be preparing to de-orbit the ISS if no deal is done with the Russians. By the time new modules are designed, built and launched, and some sort of plan for separating the Russian side from the US side is done, it will be well into the next decade. Too much investment for a 30-40 year old spacecraft.

  • duheagle

    If they bailed on us then they couldn’t extort us. Don’t try spinning this as Russian virtue.

  • Robert G. Oler

    no…there are already plans in work by prrivate companies to take over the Russian reboost role for instance

  • Robert G. Oler

    no it will not. unless there is massive federal dollars there

  • Andrew_M_Swallow

    If the Federal Government wants to spend lots of money on space there is plenty of space in a B330 for costly equipment. A second spacestation can act as the Lunar Gateway. The propulsion firms can work on a manned lunar lander and LEO-LLO cargo tug. For really big money construct Moon base.

  • duheagle

    The whole point of Bigelow stations is to take a lot of “mass” out of the needed budget. The max crew complement of a B330 is six, the same as the normative crew size on ISS. On ISS only two or three of said crew are Americans. NASA could buy a long-term lease on half a B330 for a fraction of what ISS costs per year. Bigelow won’t have any trouble finding takers for the other half. ISRO, for example, might be very interested by 2022 based on recently announced manned space plans. A second module would allow JAXA and ESA long-term, affordable multi-crew presences in LEO post-ISS too with maybe even a slot or two available for others – UAE perhaps.