NASA Statement on Soyuz MS-10 Launch Failure


Astronaut Nick Hague (left) and Roscosmos General Director Dmitry Rogozin. (Credit: Roscosmos)

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has shared the following statement on Twitter @JimBridenstine.

NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin are in good condition following today’s aborted launch. I’m grateful that everyone is safe. A thorough investigation into the cause of the incident will be conducted. Full statement below:

The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station at 4:40 a.m. EDT Thursday, October 11 (2:40 p.m. in Baikonur) carrying American astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin. Shortly after launch, there was an anomaly with the booster and the launch ascent was aborted, resulting in a ballistic landing of the spacecraft.

Search and rescue teams were deployed to the landing site. Hague and Ovchinin are out of the capsule and are reported to be in good condition. They will be transported to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia outside of Moscow.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and the NASA team are monitoring the situation carefully. NASA is working closely with Roscosmos to ensure the safe return of the crew. Safety of the crew is the utmost priority for NASA. A thorough investigation into the cause of the incident will be conducted.

  • Terry Stetler

    Bridenstine needs to corner the Commercial Crew PM’s and shake that much delayed paperwork for Crew Dragon loose. Crew Dragon DM-1 and its booster are gathering dust at the Cape.

  • Douglas Messier

    The problems are worse than paperwork.

  • ThomasLMatula

    Evidence? And if they are it’s time for NASA to put a tiger team on them like in the Apollo era.

  • Kirk

    Hard evidence either way is slim, but last week at IAC 2018 Hans Koenigsmann suggested that they were targeting December 2019 for DM-1 hardware completion, and that paperwork concerns, which could delay the launch into the new year, are not the only holdup.

    https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1047428050772811777

  • Kirk

    Hard evidence either way is slim, but last week at IAC 2018 Hans
    Koenigsmann suggested that they were targeting December 2018 for DM-1
    hardware completion, and that paperwork concerns, which could delay the
    launch into the new year, are not the only holdup.

    https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1047428050772811777

  • Douglas Messier

    Nothing I can write about now. Keep in mind that the paperwork answer is SpaceX’s explanation for the schedule.

  • ThomasLMatula

    I assume that was based on a normal work schedule. Perhaps now is the time for NASA and SpaceX to get together and see what they could really do.

  • duheagle

    No, I guess we should automatically assume the opposite as you always do.

  • Douglas Messier

    The term “paperwork” doesn’t begin to cover the complexity of preparing a new crewed vehicle for flight. Or what’s actually going on behind the scenes.

  • duheagle

    I’m sure there’s a great deal going on behind the scenes. And most of it,
    I’ll wager, probably looks a lot like what one sees when overturning a flat rock – nothing appetizing. NASA is an aged and infirm bureaucracy that – quite correctly in my view – sees all sorts of grave threats to its continued bumbling existence issuing from quarters, such as SpaceX, over which it has rapidly decreasing control. This is the sort of thing “crusading” journalists used to delight in exposing. But since the journalism profession now seems to consist almost entirely of unblushing statist tools, all you do is pimp for the real bad guys – the government establishment.

  • duheagle

    I’m sure SpaceX could speed up whatever is currently in production anent Dragon 2. Rumor has it that all that’s keeping Dragon 2 from flying tomorrow is completing the attachment of solar arrays to the trunk. If Koenigsmann thought it could be done by December even before today’s Soyuz misadventure, it could probably be done even sooner if a shift or two was added in Hawthorne.

    But December is actually soon enough. This first unmanned Dragon 2 test flight and docking exercise should be launched in Dec. instead of Jan. Rather than return quickly, the D2 should stay on ISS to take the baton of lifeboat duty from the iffy Soyuz now docked there. That Soyuz can be left in place for the nonce, then safely detached and dumped once a second D2 – with a crew on it – comes up, maybe in Mar. or April.

    There’s no need to scramble madly, but a firm decision to get D2 operational ASAP – with the in-flight abort test either abandoned or saved for later, and the same with all the #$%@)& paperwork – would demonstrate a welcome fresh breath of gravitas and competence from an organization – NASA – where such things have been in damned short supply for far too long. This is Bridenstine’s big chance to step up and show us he’s worthy of his hire.

  • Douglas Messier

    This is so ignorant that I don’t even know where to start.

    Thanks for stopping by, though. Please come again.

  • duheagle

    Count on it.

  • Douglas Messier

    https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/10/13/safety-panel-says-much-work-left-to-do-before-commercial-crew-ships-fly/

    This might help. Note the explanation of what the “paperwok” actually involves.

    Also note the actual technical milestones that Boeing and SpaceX have not yet met. There are real issues for both.

    Bonus: Note the statement that Boeing and SpaceX should do all-up testing of all the systems in the first uncrewed flight tests. That’s extremely significant.