SpaceX Plans Three Launches in 11 Days

The first Falcon 9 Block 5 booster heads for the launch pad at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. (Credit: SpaceX)

After a three-week break, SpaceX is gearing up for a busy stretch of launches with three coming up in an 11-day period on opposite sides of the country.

The launch campaign kicks off with an early Sunday morning launch from Cape Canaveral. Falcon 9 will carry Telesat’s Telstar 19 VANTAGE communications satellite, which will provide service to China, India, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Ocean.

Three days later, a Falcon 9 is scheduled to launch the Iridium Next 56-65 communications satellites from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

Elon Musk’s launch company also plans to launch the Telstar 18 VANTAGE communications satellite not earlier than August 17 from Cape Canaveral. A Falcon 9 launch of the Es’hail 2 communications satellite could also take place next month, although no date has been set yet.

Delta IV Heavy is set to launch NASA’s Parker Solar Probe on Aug. 6. The spacecraft will fly into the sun’s atmosphere at a distance of four million miles from the star’s surface.

Europe has two launches coming up. On July 25, an Ariane 5 is scheduled to orbit the Galileo 23-26 navigation satellites from Kourou in French Guiana.

A Vega launch vehicle is scheduled to lift off with the Aeolus environmental satellite on Aug. 21. Aeolus will the first satellite to deliver daily wind profiles on a global scale.

India is also planning the launch of the GSAT 29 communications satellite using its largest booster, the GSLV Mk. 3. No date has been set for launch.

The full schedule is below. Please check with Spaceflightnow.com for updates.

July 22

Launch Vehicle: Falcon 9
Payload: Telstar 19 VANTAGE communications satellite
Launch Window: 1:50-5:50 a.m. EDT (0550-0950 GMT)
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

July 25

Launch Vehicle: Ariane 5
Payloads: Galileo 23-26 navigation satellites
Launch time: 7:25:01 a.m. EDT (1125:01 GMT )
Launch site: ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana

Launch Vehicle: Falcon 9
Payloads: Iridium Next 56-65 communications satellites
Launch Time: 7:39:26 a.m. EDT; 4:39:26 a.m. PDT (1139:26 GMT)
Launch Site: Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

August 2

Launch Vehicle: Falcon 9
Payload: Merah Putih communications satellite
Launch Time: 1:19-3:19 a.m. EDT (0519-0719 GMT)
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

August 6

Launch Vehicle: Delta 4 Heavy
Payload: Parker Solar Probe
Launch Time: Approximately 4 a.m. EDT (0800 GMT)
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The NASA spacecraft will travel into the sun’s atmosphere at a distance of about 4 million miles from the surface.

NET Aug. 17/18

Launch Vehicle: Falcon 9
Payload: Telstar 18 VANTAGE communications satellite
Launch Window: 11:35 p.m.-3:35 a.m. EDT on 17th/18th (0335-0735 GMT on 18th)
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

Aug. 21

Launch Vehicle: Vega
Payload: Aeolus
Launch Time: 5:20 p.m. EDT (2120 GMT)
Launch Site: Kourou, French Guiana

Aeolus will the first satellite to deliver daily wind profiles on a global scale.

August/TBD

Launch Vehicle: Falcon 9
Payload: Es’hail 2 communications satellite
Launch Window: TBD
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

Launch Vehicle: GSLV Mk.3
Payload: GSAT 29 communications satellite
Launch Time: TBD
Launch Tite: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

  • Mr Snarky Answer

    That’s like 1/4 to 1/3 of ULA’s yearly productivity in 11 days. #spacexsteamtoller

  • Ignacio Rockwill

    Go get ’em SpaceX!

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    Anybody know why the Iridium was delayed from the beginning of July to the end of July?

  • envy

    It was never actually scheduled in early July. The first official date we had was July 20, which was bumped to July 25. Before that all we had was Matt Desch tweeting “mid to late July”, and the FCC application which stated NET July 9 (but application dates are not target dates).

    https://twitter.com/IridiumBoss/status/1001144325521231872

    https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45440.msg1819202#msg1819202

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    Ah! Thanks!