• Dave Erskine

    To make comparison of size and ambition…finding a purpose when the market has shifted. Yup, 12 years ago and even 7 the way forward was not the BFR or FH but some form of aircraft-as-first-stage-launch the rocket/payload/passengers cheaper or at least flexibiler (sic). Now its Electron for the small and SX for the heavy. Hey, its just plain geeky fun to route for these big toy projects.

  • ThomasLMatula

    I was thinking that a P-38 would complete the picture. Three generations of twin boom aircraft.

  • Douglas Messier

    Interesting that Virgin Galactic is apparently doing envelope expansion on an aircraft that first flew on Dec. 21, 2008. Nine and a half years later. Maybe they’ll just fly SpaceShipTwo to 200,000 feet and release it. Should be able to get above the Karman line from there.

    Kidding, of course. It might be related to recent legislation allowing companies to use support aircraft for spacecraft participant training and research. Maybe some parabolic flights or something. Don’t know, didn’t see WhiteKnightTwo flying around the other day.

    Wonder when the next powered flight will be. They’re keeping everything under wraps over there these days. Keep watching the skis…uh…skies.

  • Nkolo.Awono

    Could Stratolaunch lift spacex BfS?
    If so it could be an alternative to spacex BfB

  • Larry J

    StratoLaunch and WK2 are twin-fuselage, not twin boom. In that, they’re closer to the He-111Z (I’m pretty sure none still exist) and the F-82 Twin Mustang. WK1 is closer in overall layout to the P-38.

  • ThomasLMatula

    True, the F-82 is a better match being a twin fuselage aircraft. But none of the survivors are in flyable condition, while there are some flying P-38’s to use. It would be good to show WK1 which is of the generation before, but it’s in Paul Allen’s museum.

  • Larry J

    There are a couple F-82s being restored to airworthy condition. One of them is the prototype XP-82. Both projects still have a way to go, though. New parts are nonexistent so they’re having to be fabricated.

  • ThomasLMatula

    Yes, the need to have left turning engines and props are the real show stopper.

  • Larry J

    The European company MT Propellers has stepped up and provided those critical pieces.

    http://xp-82twinmustangproject.blogspot.com/2015/11/october-xp-82-twin-mustang-restoration.html

  • ThomasLMatula

    Yes, SpaceX and Blue Origin have left them behind, just as the C-54/DC-4 and C-69/Constellation left the Spruce Goose behind as a relic of history.

  • ThomasLMatula

    That is good. It would be nice to see one on the airshow circuit doing display flights.

  • Larry J

    The former Confederate Air Force (now Commemorative Air Force) used to fly an F-82 but it was damaged in a landing accident. IIRC, one of the landing gears collapsed and the props were damaged. They tried for years to repair it but couldn’t find the necessary parts. The US Air Force reclaimed the plane, saying it was only on loan to the CAF.

    The Twin Mustang was a weird and wonderful plane. Some of the later versions were powered by Allison engines, strangely enough. One F-82B, the “Betty Jo” (currently on display at the Air Force Museum), set a world record by flying nonstop from Hawaii to New York. The first aerial kill by the US in the Korean War was by an F-82.

  • Eric Wilcox

    if only has a payload capacity of 500,000 lbs. The Falcon 9 at launch is about 1,000,000. This wouldn’t be able to lift the BFR for sure

  • Eric Wilcox

    like the spruce goose this will be little more than a novelty with no lasting, useful application….

    tho i’m hoping they manage to get i little higher off the ground than the spruce goose… maybe 75 ft! 😉

  • Nkolo.Awono

    Thanks for the informations, but the falcon 9 that’s the Booster+second stage,
    Stratolaunch would only have to lift the Ship without the Booster.
    I assume even the Big Falcon Ship alone will weigh more than that.

  • Michael Vaicaitis

    Over 1300 tonnes – nearly 3,000,000 lbs. Where exactly do you think Straolaunch might of lifted BFS?.
    BFB will lift BFS to 80 km and 4000+ mph.
    An air-launch plane is NOT a first stage, it is a mobile launch pad.

  • Eric Wilcox

    yes for sure the falcon 9 would be lighter if it was being launched from an aerial platform but since I don’t have those numbers… Anyway just looking at what we know of the falcon 9 and it’s relative size to the BFR… it’s not too hard to imagine that the mass of the BFR (even with it set for an air launch) would be too much payload for the vehicle as it will be a 9m diameter rocket that (in the ground launch configuration) will be larger than the saturn IV.

  • patb2009

    Roc is almost big enough to air drop WK2