ILS Secures Additional Orders for Proton Medium Vehicle

Proton launches EchoStar 21 satellite. (Credit: Roscosmos)

RESTON, Va. (ILS PR) — ILS, a leading provider of commercial launch services, announced multiple launch assignments for Proton Medium launches that will include the use of both the 4.35 meter and the new 5.2 meter payload fairing. The missions will take place beginning in late 2019 from Pad 24 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The Proton Medium launch vehicle is an optimized 2-stage version of the heritage Proton Breeze M vehicle. The medium class vehicle serves the lighter weight satellites in the 3.5 to 6 Metric Ton range with the capability to launch single, dual or multiple satellites to a variety of orbits. The Proton Medium vehicle utilizes either the 5.2 or 4.35 meter payload fairing with the benefits of the standard, flight-proven Proton Breeze M configuration and spacecraft insertion history.

“Since its introduction in the fall of 2016, and following the first firm launch order for the vehicle at that time, the Proton Medium has continued to gain traction and interest in the marketplace,” said Kirk Pysher, President of ILS. “Customers continue to look for vehicles that are right-sized for new-generation missions but also provide compelling value and launch vehicle diversity.” Pysher continued, “We look forward to the upcoming launches starting next year.”

About ILS

ILS is a leader in providing launch services for satellite operators and offers a complete array of services and support, from contract arrangements, mission management and on-orbit delivery. ILS markets the Proton Breeze M, Proton Medium, and Angara 1.2 launch services to commercial and government satellite operators worldwide. ILS is a U.S. company headquartered in Reston, VA., near Washington, D.C.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    I like this line …. “the benefits of the standard, flight-proven Proton Breeze M”. Breeze has been the root cause of many Proton failures since its introduction in the past century. I believe the program is on the order of 40 years old now and it’s still ending flights early.

  • duheagle

    Yeah, bringing up Breeze M was certainly worthy of a spit take.

    I also like the unusual anonymity of the alleged Proton Medium contractees. Press releases like this are essentially brags about one company landing another company as a client. Both companies are named and each effusively praises and flatters the other with direct quotes from each firm’s Big Cheeses. There is also typically one such press release issued for each new client contract. It’s not like we haven’t read a metric buttload of these things in exactly that format right here on Parabolic Arc over the years. The one about DigitalGlobe and SpaceX two posts up is a classic of the genre.

    Here we have something more closely resembling the PR equivalent of a mass grave with some unspecified number of nameless new occupants tossed in, each allegedly having signed for an equally vague total number of launch missions.

    Absent any specifics – and we are absent all specifics here – I’m going to assume this current release has about as much veracity as the human rights guarantees in the old Soviet constitution. As the late Mr. Rogers might have said, “Can you say Potemkin Village? I knew you could.”

  • Terry Stetler

    ISTM those launches are likely captive missions for the Russian government, not commercial missions. Otherwise, as you say, they be tooting their horn.