Astronaut Evaluate Crew Dragon Controls

Astronauts Bob Behnken and Eric Boe evaluate Crew Dragon controls. (Credit: NASA)

HAWTHORNE, Calif. (NASA PR) — Astronauts Bob Behnken, left, and Eric Boe evaluated the controls, seating and other aspects of the crew compartment of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft during a recent visit to the company’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California. Sitting in a mock-up of the Crew Dragon cockpit, the two studied many aspects of the layout including spacing of displays and ease of movement.

The testing is taking place as SpaceX develops the Crew Dragon with an eye toward launching the spacecraft into orbit in the near future on a flight test to and from the International Space Station. Later, the Crew Dragons, launching atop Falcon 9 rockets, will perform operational missions to rotate crews aboard the orbiting laboratory. Companies build high fidelity models of their spacecraft and systems to help determine everything from practicality and operation to fit and comfort.

  • windbourne

    it will be interesting to see how this compares to Starliner.
    I only wish that the astronauts would actually speak up after flying both.

  • Paul_Scutts

    It would be best, for any controls test, if the astronauts were wearing helmets and gloves that at least approximate the gear they will be wearing during actual operations.

  • Michael Vaicaitis

    Not too happy about this – giving apes control of spacecraft is a bad idea.

  • Michael Vaicaitis

    Do you really think they’re gonna let astronauts fly these vehicles?. Imagine being a passenger and hearing “This is your pilot speaking – the computers are down and I will be taking control”……brown mist!!! – I’d rather get out and walk.

  • JamesG

    Which is why you’ll never be an astronaut. Please stop, you’re only embarrassing yourself.

  • JamesG

    This was just a PR junket and photo-op. Most of the high fidelity realistic design and testing has already been done. These are the trainers where they are going to go thru procs and contingencies end. less. ly. until they can do them in their sleep.

  • Hug Doug

    The pressure suits are only for launch and re-entry, so most of the time they won’t have their helmets and gloves on anyway.

  • Hug Doug

    Here’s an earlier article about Starliner astronaut training:

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/simulators-give-astronauts-glimpse-of-future-flights

  • Michael Vaicaitis

    Sorry, I’m afraid critical thinking most often overcomes my dogmatic biases. I have been told that ignorance is bliss – think yourself lucky.

  • JamesG

    You should know what you are talking about before you form an opinion. Critical or otherwise.

  • Michael Vaicaitis

    Every first stage ever launched, every second/upper stage ever launched, all re-entries, all first stages ever landed. Are you claiming that all of these had human pilots onboard?. So, when it really counts, when human life is on the line, should we resort to aeroplane pilots or the computer “pilots” that control all other spacecraft?. By all means, continue with your line of useful argument.

  • JamesG

    OTOH, No human crewed spacecraft has been lost to “pilot error” however several have been due to if not computer, design or system error. But keep dancing around with that red herring.

  • Terry Stetler

    If it makes you feel better, there’s a big “Deorbit Now” bugout button..

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d05bb4da4d5879b945e6cfa91ca291ef4cb6830f609f50c109900a356e1c7d41.jpg

  • Paul_Scutts

    Thanks for your reply, Doug, but, proper testing would have to allow for all possible situations that would affect vision and manual dexterity. Regards, Paul.

  • Paul_Scutts

    Thanks for your reply, James. You’re probably right, but, I went by the caption. They should have had a different caption, something like “Astronauts … playing with Crew Dragon controls”. 🙂 Regards, Paul.

  • Hug Doug

    Of course it would. There’s no need to suit up for the majority of training, though.

  • publiusr

    I’m more concerned about how suits will effect going out the hatch. I wonder if the reason behind Boeings new “blue-suits” is for them to get out of Starliner or Orion but be bulky for Dragon?