Soyuz Launcher Suffers “Anomaly” During Progress Launch

The Progress 65 spacecraft is pictured at its launch pad Nov. 29 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (Credit: Roscosmos)
The Progress 65 spacecraft is pictured at its launch pad Nov. 29 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (Credit: Roscosmos)

Mission Update From NASA
Dec. 1, 2016 — 11:29 a.m. EST

Launch of the ISS Progress 65 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan occurred at 9:51 a.m. EST (8:51 p.m. Baikonur time). An anomaly occurred sometime during the third stage operation. As we get updates from Roscosmos, we will provide them.

Our astronauts and the Russian cosmonauts are safe aboard the station. Consumables aboard the station are at good levels.

An H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-6 from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is scheduled to launch to the space station on Friday, Dec. 9.

To join the online conversation about the International Space Station and Progress 65 on Twitter, follow @Space_Station. To learn more about all the ways to connect and collaborate with NASA, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/connect.

Editor’s Note, 9:32 a.m. PST: Reliable Twitter reports say Mission Control in Houston has informed International Space Station Commander Shane Kimbrough that the launch of the Progress supply ship has failed. The Russians have sent their Progress team home for the day and are forming a state commission to investigate the failure.

Editor’s Note, 9:11 a.m. PST: It appears the third stage may have cut out early, which would have put Progress in lower than planned orbit. There are unconfirmed social media reports from Russia of a large explosion in the sky, a large bang and falling debris, so Progress may have reentered the atmosphere. Let me stress these are unconfirmed reports at this time.

I’ll update this story as we learn more. You can also follow me on Twitter at www.twitter.com/spacecom.

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  • Jacob Samorodin

    International cooperation, huh? What happens if, God forbid, Russia invades Estonia? What happens to US and Russian cooperation then? Even Trump would say, enough, and cut ties with Putin. And any astronauts onboard ISS would be told to leave on the next Soyuz home.

  • Oops!

  • JamesG

    Probably not. US and Soviet space agencies were developing and planning the Apollo/Soyuz mission while their air forces were (unofficially) shooting at each other above Vietnam and proxy wars raged all around the world.

  • windbourne

    while I am against trump, one thing that I would love to see him do, is restore working with Russia to go to the moon.
    Far better to have back channels, than no channels.

  • camping

    Few more years and we won’t have to worry about it!

  • camping

    Apparently he might even soothe chinese relations, too…and they can get astronauts up. Though, I don’t know if I believe it. I personally want Trump to put a big ol tariff on anything imported from any country that uses child labor, especially China.

  • Space is the ONE THING that can smooth over a lot of international tensions and possibly a space war, since all nations have it, they all want to do it, and they’re all basically bursting at the seems with people, children, babies, problems and pollution, etc. Hopefully somebody in Trumptopia will see it.

  • patb2009

    excellent reporting Doug.

  • patb2009

    Even in the ugliest parts of the Cold War, the US/Soviet cooperation was solid. From the IGY to ASTP and combined science missions looking at Venus and earth science missions.

    https://www.nasa.gov/50th/50th_magazine/coldWarCoOp.html

    https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/partners_us_russian_cooperation_in_human_spaceflight.pdf