Rocket Lab Signs Commercial Space Launch Act Agreement With NASA

Founder and CEO Peter Beck displays Rocket Lab’s accumulated expertise in carbon composite launch vehicles. (Credit: Rocket Lab)
Founder and CEO Peter Beck displays Rocket Lab’s accumulated expertise in carbon composite launch vehicles. (Credit: Rocket Lab)

LOS ANGELES (Rocket Lab PR) — Rocket Lab has signed a Commercial Space Launch Act Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The agreement enables Rocket Lab to use NASA resources – including personnel, facilities and equipment – for launch efforts.

Rocket Lab is considering using NASA’s launch complexes to complement Rocket Lab’s primary launch range in New Zealand.

“Rocket Lab is pleased to have the opportunity to utilize NASA facilities for those customers that may require lower inclination orbits,” said Peter Beck, Rocket Lab CEO.

Use of a NASA range will give Rocket Lab the ability to launch Electron to lower orbital inclinations than the company’s New Zealand range, which offers inclinations from sun-synchronous through to 45 degrees.

“While launches from New Zealand can reach inclinations that are generally ideal for small satellites, the addition of a United States launch site will allow customers to have the choice of a wider spectrum of orbital inclinations,” said Beck. “This agreement with NASA is another step in building out our launch ranges globally.”

“NASA is committed to promoting the continued evolution of the U.S. commercial space launch market,” said Jim Norman, Director of Launch Services at NASA Headquarters. “Our agreement with Rocket Lab USA, Inc to make NASA’s unique space capabilities and infrastructure available can increase commercial launch options.”

“We are pleased to be growing our relationship with NASA, as both organizations work to increase commercial opportunities in space,” said Beck.

  • Vladislaw

    Good news, hope it brings another player into the game.

  • DTARS

    I know they are cheap throw away rockets.
    But they would sure look cool with legs and waffle control fins. I wonder if the middle engine can deep throttle and how many time the engines can relight?
    Looks like a cute falcon 9 to me 🙂