Orion Launch Weather Forecast Improves

Credit: NASA
Credit: NASA

NASA MISSION UPDATE

Meteorologists upgraded their outlook for Orion’s launch tomorrow morning to give it a 70 percent chance of acceptable conditions. The forecast says drier conditions are expected and the chance of coastal showers has diminished during the 2-hour, 39-minute launch window. The primary rules concerns remain flight through precipitation and high winds.

With less than 23 hours remaining before Orion begins its first flight test with a launch on a Delta IV Heavy rocket, everything remains on track for liftoff at 7:05 a.m. EST. The Mobile Service Tower enclosing the rocket and spacecraft will be rolled back to its launch position late tonight, revealing the Orion stack on the launch stand at Space Launch Complex 37.

Launch and mission control teams will report to their consoles in Florida and Houston at about 3:30 a.m. EST. Our continuous countdown, launch and mission coverage will begin at 4:30 a.m. here on the Orion Blog and on NASA TV which is available on air and streaming at www.nasa.gov/nasatv

  • Kraki

    This thing is such a joke. At least it keeps an army of engineers employed.

  • twizell

    What’s the joke?

  • Matt

    At least the countdown is suspenseful.

  • Kraki

    At this rate of innovation at NASA and Lockheed, we might get manned exploration of the solar system in 250 years. We did better things almost a half century ago with vacuum tubes. Seriously, put it in perspective.

  • Kraki

    Especially since many years will pass between launch attempts carrying this washing machine.

  • twizell

    I see your point, it does look a little bit as though it’s taken forty plus years just to keep up with health and safety regulations. The one thing I would say is that maybe space travel is just harder than people think?

  • Matt

    Oh yeh, the
    launch crew was overcautious with the wind issue (Russians would laugh about that
    size of a”wind” at launch). Meanwhile valve were frozen. At the end
    it was a waste of time to watch it. The US launcher technology seems too
    sensitive. Not enough robust.

  • Matt

    Chemical rocket propulsion is a mature technology, it is already queezed out to a maximum extent. On the other hand, introduction of the too many computers and sensors to survey the vehicle result in other problems as “false” alarms. It is better to keep the vehicle simple and robust and give it the ability to launch at high winds.

  • Robert Gishubl

    So even ULA can have launch delays caused by hardware problems. For a provider who claims the reliability high ground with decades of experience it is disappointing.
    On the other hand space-flight is difficult and until we get cheaper flights with re-usable rockets to get the flight rate up so the cold soak issues can be experienced and corrected, or thrust steering improved to cope with higher winds this type of thing will happen.

  • Michael J. Listner

    Launching a rocket is no joke.

  • Guest

    Orion is. The more people coddle technological stagnation with facile justifications like “Rocket science is hard!”, we’ll get more of the same. Which clearly is all many people want.

    I’m not trying to get into a shouting match, just stating my opinion. So, I’d let it go.

  • Michael J. Listner

    You’re entitled to your opinion. I don’t argue on these forums anymore. Pre-New Years resolution.