Orbital Updates Schedule for COTS Demo Mission

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The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket is seen on the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) Pad-0A at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Tuesday, April 16, 2013 in Virginia.  NASA's commercial space partner, Orbital Sciences Corporation, is scheduled to launch Antares on Wednesday, April 17, 2013.  Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket is seen on the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) Pad-0A at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Tuesday, April 16, 2013 in Virginia. NASA’s commercial space partner, Orbital Sciences Corporation, is scheduled to launch Antares on Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Via Orbital Sciences Corporation

Orbital Sciences Corporation is targeting September 15 as the first opportunity to conduct the Antares launch of our Cygnus spacecraft for the COTS Demonstration Mission to the International Space Station (ISS) originating from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility Wallops. In the event that weather or other operational factors require the date to shift, the company will seek to carry out the launch no later than September 19. Currently, the Antares rocket for the COTS Demonstration Mission is completing testing at the Horizontal Integration Facility (HIF) at Wallops and will soon begin integration with the Cygnus spacecraft. Orbital anticipates that it will roll out the Antares rocket with the integrated Cygnus spacecraft to Pad 0A at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) on or about September 11 to be ready for a September 15 launch.

  • DaIllogicalVulkan

    Orbital Sciences has been around for a while now but does anyone know if the company is making some efforts at reduced-cost launching like Spacex and BlueOrigin or there going to continue the same business plan as ULA?

  • mattmcc80

    Orbital doesn’t have a lot of room to reduce costs in the way SpaceX does. They don’t build the Cygnus pressurized module, they buy it from Thales. They buy the entire Antares second stage from ATK, and the first stage engines from Aerojet. That’s a lot of the rocket & capsule where they’re not in control of production costs or management overhead. Since SpaceX builds everything (first stage, second stage, capsule) in-house under one roof they have a lot more control over their costs.

  • DaIllogicalVulkan

    ah ok, thanks
    and this is also true for their other launchers too right?